smart-hydro.de

Small hydro and bioenergy – highly efficient solutions for energy access

Marcus Wiemann, Executive Director (ARE)

Why advancing bioenergy in Africa is important

By Clifford Spencer, Goodwill Ambassador African Union, NEPAD

I am writing this co-editorial having recently been appointed a Goodwill Ambassador of the New Partnership for Africa’s Development (NEPAD) Agency. My new assignment has immediately drawn my attention to the importance of access to electricity in Africa and the key role that bioenergy and biofuels play in this regard.

Read more

I am writing this co-editorial having recently been appointed a Goodwill Ambassador of the New Partnership for Africa’s Development (NEPAD) Agency. My new assignment has immediately drawn my attention to the importance of access to electricity in Africa and the key role that bioenergy and biofuels play in this regard. 

Rural electrification is viewed differently in different countries‎ and most importantly the overwhelming need for it, and the mechanisms and energy choices to power it, are often very misunderstood. I give that view as an experienced farmer of some 40 + years standing around the globe. 

I would like to highlight the importance of bioenergy and its potential towards rural electrification in Africa. Bioenergy is the continent’s current predominant power source and therefore its use demands real attention.‎ The development of modern bioenergy can act as a significant driver to agricultural development and with it enhanced food production. Add to this the availability of power for transport, crop and food processing and crop and food drying and cooling and then the power of bioenergy to create a vibrant bio-economy leaps into focus. This is particularly so with regard to land rich and low population density regions and countries. For these reasons I commend the Bioenergy campaign between ARE and PANGEA and the new Sustainable Bioenergy High Impact Opportunity area (HIO) under SE4ALL.

The NEPAD Agency is aware of the enormous renewable energy resources in Africa which are generally underutilised and could play a significant role in increasing energy access to clean and modern energy resources. It follows an approach in its development of these resources which is based on economic viability, social inclusiveness and environmental protection. 

In this regard, the NEPAD Agency is driving the implementation of the UN Initiative SE4ALL in Africa, which among its three objectives is to double the share of renewable energy resources in the total energy mix. I have spoken and presented on this topic during the formation of SE4ALL.

Africa has taken the lead in responding to the Initiative with 44 African countries out of 84 globally having opted in. Member States are required to set up mechanisms to make universal access to durable modern energy services a priority.

Some of NEPAD's activities under SE4ALL are the setting up of an Africa SE4ALL Coordination Hub jointly with the African Union Commission and the African Development Bank. Currently, the Agency is completing the first Action Agenda and Investment Prospectus of SE4ALL in Africa with these being for the countries of Gambia and Kenya, to identify and accelerate the implementation of sustainable and high priority energy projects. The NEPAD Agency is also formulating an Africa Response and is developing an Africa Action Plan and Strategy for decentralised energy systems.

NEPAD is also cooperating with the International Renewable Energy Agency (IRENA) in developing an Africa Clean Energy Corridor and is leading the implementation of the Africa Sustainable Framework for Bioenergy Utilisation.

 

Diesel replacement for rice crop irrigation in Neiva, Colombia

By Dr. Karl Kolmsee & Juliana Carneiro da Cunha Baumgartl, CEO & Marketing, Smart Hydro Power

Replacement of diesel with renewable energy offers attractive opportunities. This is particularly true for off-grid agricultural applications such as irrigation. Smart Hydro Power (SHP) is stepping into the agricultural market this year and will perform an installation of a SMART Hybrid System for rice crops in Neiva, Colombia.

Read more

By Dr. Karl Kolmsee & Juliana Carneiro da Cunha Baumgartl, CEO & Marketing, Smart Hydro Power

Replacement of diesel with renewable energy offers attractive opportunities. This is particularly true for off-grid agricultural applications such as irrigation. Smart Hydro Power (SHP) is stepping into the agricultural market this year and will perform an installation of a SMART Hybrid System for rice crops in Neiva, Colombia.

SHP) is stepping into the agricultural market this year and will perform an installation of a SMART Hybrid System for rice crops in Neiva, Colombia.

Rice is one of the most important cereals cultivated in Colombia, with approximately 490,000 ha of the cereal cultivated every year from more than 20,000 farmers and their families. Most of the farmers in Colombia are small holders and around 70% of the farms are smaller than 10 ha and are located in remote areas. Since power grid extension to these areas is too expensive, the irrigation activities are powered by diesel generators. Consequently, the farmers struggle with fuel prices and a standardised solution for this problem is required. Nowadays, diesel is financed by agricultural trading companies. These companies finance the production and buy the rice at fixed prices – often below the market price. Local, sustainable energy solutions allow farmers more efficient commercialisation of their harvest.

Our Colombian partners are the two sisters that own a mid-sized farm business. This project of diesel replacement is part of the worldwide dena Renewable Energy Solutions Program coordinated by Deutsche Energie-Agentur (dena) - the German Energy Agency - and co-financed by the German Federal Ministry for Economic Affairs and Energy (BMWi) within the initiative “renewables – Made in Germany“. Within the framework of the program, reference and demonstration projects are installed. 

dena is Germany's center of expertise for energy efficiency, renewable energy sources and intelligent energy systems. dena's aim is to ensure that energy is used in both a national and international context as efficiently, safely and economically as possible with the least possible impact on climate. dena is working with stakeholders from the worlds of politics and business and from society at large to achieve this aim.

In Neiva, rice farmers beside the river Magdalena are not connected to the national grid and are using highly inefficient diesel pumps spending large portions of their costs on energy. Due to the base load supply of the hydrokinetic turbine, this technology is the most suitable to plug into an irrigation pump in order to decrease the cost per kWh by approx. 50% compared to a diesel generator. The SMART Hybrid System, which consists of a hydrokinetic turbine, photovoltaic panels and (optionally) a diesel generator, was developed to offer a continuous, convenient and scalable renewable energy solution that is affordable in developing countries.

The SMART turbine utilises kinetic energy from rivers or canals to power electric pumps to lift and transport water. Different from photovoltaics, the generator delivers a stable supply without major daily variations; therefore it can be matched with a range of pumps, whether single phase or 3-phase. It is estimated that, in this region of Neiva, there are around 30 other farmers completely dependent on diesel generators, each with a 100 kW diesel Pump installed. 

Smart Hydro Power GmbH develops and commercialises affordable and environmentally-friendly solutions for rural electrification. The backbone of these solutions is a kinetic micro hydropower system (river turbine).

 

Promoting bioenergy through education

By Elena Cantos, PR & Marketing Director, RENAC

Bioenergy as a renewable energy resource offers many advantages: it can be converted into various forms of secondary and final energy. Biomass, the primary energy source, can be transformed into solid, liquid and gaseous energy carriers. The combustion of these energy carriers can produce heat, cold, electricity, mechanical power or a combination of these. Even better than this, bioenergy is storable, so it can be converted right at the time energy is needed to balance the differences between energy supply and demand.

Read more

By Elena Cantos, PR & Marketing Director, RENAC

Bioenergy as a renewable energy resource offers many advantages: it can be converted into various forms of secondary and final energy. Biomass, the primary energy source, can be transformed into solid, liquid and gaseous energy carriers. The combustion of these energy carriers can produce heat, cold, electricity, mechanical power or a combination of these. Even better than this, bioenergy is storable, so it can be converted right at the time energy is needed to balance the differences between energy supply and demand. 

The Renewables Academy AG (RENAC), based in Berlin, Germany, is a leading international provider of training and capacity building on renewable energy and energy efficiency. RENAC delivers customised educational contents along the whole value chain. Since its founding in 2008, about 4,500 participants from more than 134 countries worldwide have taken part in RENAC training programmes.

Currently, RENAC is offering different trainings on bioenergy:

Green Energy Summer School: Introduction to bioenergy, 31 Aug – 4 Sep 2015, Berlin (Germany)

RENAC’s Green Energy Summer School offers an exceptional opportunity within three weeks to get an insight into renewable energy technologies and energy efficiency. Employing a blend of up-to-date theoretical lectures, state-of-the-art practical training and field excursions, GESS 2015 makes learning not only effective but also very exciting.

The training “Introduction to bioenergy” gives a detailed overview of the principles of generating bioenergy in a sustainable way. Emphasis is put on bioenergy systems - from the resources to the conversion technologies and finally to the end products. The fundamentals, benefits and potentials for heat, power and biofuels of the various conversion technologies are explored as well as cogeneration such as biomass heat and power plants. Additionally, the training focuses also on plant design, economics as well as supporting schemes and project management issues.

Other trainings include “Overview of Renewable Energy”, “Grid-connected and off-grid photovoltaics” and “Energy efficiency in the industry and buildings”. 

Applying Renewable Energy: RENAC Online training on biogas
RENAC’s objective is to make knowledge on renewable energies available worldwide, for participants in any location or time zone. For this purpose, RENAC has launched the Renewables Academy Online (RENAC Online). RENAC Online offers a selection of courses on a wide variety of renewable energy technologies. Participants can combine them with flexibility to build their personalised trainings according to their previous knowledge, interests and needs. The topics available are biogas, electricity, photovoltaic, wind power, CSP and PV-diesel minigrids.

BIOGAS3: Trainings on small-scale biogas from agri-food waste for energy self-sufficiency

The two main issues concerning agro-food companies are how to utilise or dispose the organic residues originating from the food and beverage production processes and how to meet the large energy demands of these production processes. The European Union-funded project BIOGAS3 deals with both aspects through “Sustainable small-scale biogas from agri-food waste for energy self-sufficiency”.

Currently the project consortium offers free online webinars and regional workshops in the participating European countries: France, Germany, Italy, Ireland, Poland, Spain and Sweden.

 

Developing avenues for EU-India collaboration in bioenergy

By Ananya Roy, Communications Executive, EBTC 

India where nearly 70% of the population still lives in rural areas (Census 2011), bioenergy remains one of the largest and most easily accessible forms of energy for the majority of India. According to the Ministry of New and Renewable Energy (MNRE), about 32% of the total primary energy use is derived from biomass. Efficient and scalable yet novel solutions are required to address adverse environmental and health effects of traditional bioenergy for use in households, small businesses and industrial scale.

Read more

By Ananya Roy, Communications Executive, EBTC 

India where nearly 70% of the population still lives in rural areas (Census 2011), bioenergy remains one of the largest and most easily accessible forms of energy for the majority of India. According to the Ministry of New and Renewable Energy (MNRE), about 32% of the total primary energy use is derived from biomass. Efficient and scalable yet novel solutions are required to address adverse environmental and health effects of traditional bioenergy for use in households, small businesses and industrial scale.

Exploring synergies: Waste-to-energy examples from Sweden

The European Business and Technology Centre (EBTC) engaged with experts from Europe and India to identify areas of mutual synergy in knowledge sharing, technology adaptation and transfer. In November 2014, a ‘Roundtable on Bioenergy’ was organised in Kolkata by the Bengal Chamber of Commerce and Industry, Indian Institute of Social Welfare and Business Management and the World Bioenergy Association in association with EBTC.  Challenges such as the higher cost of finance; inadequate government policies; increasing capital, operational and maintenance costs, lack of capital subsidy were discussed. Best practices and opportunities for EU-India collaboration were also explored.

Waste is a resource for bioenergy and Sweden successfully adopted systems to manage resource flow. Cooperation between municipalities and public and private sector collaboration, as well as a focus on communication have been key success factors of the Swedish Waste Management system. A clean-tech expert mission was recently organised by EBTC with IVL Sweden to Leh and Kargil with the intention of identifying issues surrounding Municipal Solid Waste management in remote mountain regions. Best practices from the Swedish waste management system can be particularly useful to address Leh and Kargil’s solid waste issues considering low temperatures of the region.

Novel European biogas technologies can help effectively turn organic waste into clean, affordable fuel for wide varied applications.  For instance, several Swedish treatment plants are upgrading biogas to fuel for vehicles - technologies which can be applied to the Indian context, especially in rural areas. EBTC is working with one of its partners to explore transferring and adapting this technology to India, starting with a demonstration project and then commercialising in partnership with local organisations.

Looking forward

The key to success for most bioenergy projects in India is that they have been implemented by entrepreneurs, private organisations, and non-profits in collaboration with local stakeholders, and through community based programmes with social and economical development at its core. 

In recent years, EBTC has been conduit of European companies scouting for opportunities in the Indian market. Actions to explore mutually beneficial opportunities will include the formation of a cluster of stakeholders to create rich linkages which are vital for resource flow. Documentation of issues, projects, lessons at different levels and access to these are vital for knowledge transfer. 

With respect to transferring technology, the entry mode aims to work in collaboration with local companies, but also with Indian R&D organisations, government agencies, social enterprises, etc. to adapt technologies in tune with Indian conditions.

 

UNIDO’s biomass gasification project in Cuba

By Diego Masera, Chief of the Renewable and Rural Energy Unit, UNIDO

Isla de la Juventud has an area of 2,200 km2 and lies 50 km south of the Cuban mainland, almost directly south of Havana. The island has potential for tourism and good agricultural prospects but there is no grid connection with the main island of Cuba. The high price of oil imports is constraining the ability of the island’s 100,000 inhabitants to develop sustainable livelihoods.

Read more

By Diego Masera, Chief of the Renewable and Rural Energy Unit, UNIDO

Isla de la Juventud has an area of 2,200 km2 and lies 50 km south of the Cuban mainland, almost directly south of Havana. The island has potential for tourism and good agricultural prospects but there is no grid connection with the main island of Cuba. The high price of oil imports is constraining the ability of the island’s 100,000 inhabitants to develop sustainable livelihoods.

t the invitation of the government of Cuba, the United Nations Industrial Development Organization (UNIDO), in cooperation with UNEP, has implemented a project funded by the Global Environment Facility to promote the generation and delivery of renewable energy-based modern energy services to meet the growing demand for energy on Isla de la Juventud.

The project’s main goals have been to introduce new and innovative financial and institutional structures to encourage investments; support economically viable markets; promote environmentally sustainable forestry management; and enhance local manufacturing capacity for renewable energy technologies. 

A feature of the project has been to address key barriers that constrain the use of biomass for power generation. While small-scale gasification technologies are technically and commercially proven as options for sustainable power generation, in Cuba there are significant financial, institutional, technical and human resources barriers for the development of this. This project tackled these barriers with a multi-focal approach. 

With the establishment of a new revolving fund to promote investments in technology, the country now has basic funding to continue taking steps to promote this type of energy. Through multiple stakeholder meetings and awareness-raising campaigns, the project contributed to the successful establishment of a government commission to establish a national renewable energy policy. Finally, as a result of the creation of a demonstration plant and the in-depth training of local experts, the country now has the technical and human resources necessary to run and further develop this project.

The demonstration biomass gasification power plant, based in the remote village of Cocodrilo in the southern part of the island, has been generating electricity for the local community since 2010. In 2013, the plant produced electricity amounting to 56,788 kWh, saving more than 18 tons of diesel fuel. It supplies electricity to 96 households, a bakery, a primary school and the water supply system.

One of the main concerns of the local experts was that if the country utilised forest resources for the production of energy, this would lead to deforestation and damage valuable natural resources. In this context, another component of the project has been to support the development of a forest management initiative to produce 30,000 tons of biomass per year in a sustainable way, without damage to the forest, in order to supply biomass for the power plants.

Small-scale gasification systems for power generation offer the prospect of combining rural development opportunities that require electrification, with the use of locally available biomass fuels. As such, they fit very well in many sustainable development schemes. Although the technology does require further development and optimisation, UNIDO’s recent experiences with this type of technology, such as the project in Cuba, are promising.

UNIDO is currently implementing more than 60 renewable energy projects in around 50 countries.

 

Biomass and Small Hydro Sectors: EUEI PDF Selected Experiences

By Silvia Escudero, Junior Project Manager, EUEI PDF

Biomass Energy Sector Planning Guide
Good governance of the biomass energy sector is essential in developing countries where traditional biomass still accounts for more than 90% of primary energy consumption. Due to population growth and urbanisation, it is unlikely that other, more expensive fuels, such as kerosene and LPG, will offset the increasing demand for biomass energy. A suitable and functioning regulatory framework can move biomass activities from the informal to the formal sector, thereby reducing negative side effects that may be connected to overuse of biomass resources and ensure availability of basic cooking energy for the poor.

Read more

By Silvia Escudero, Junior Project Manager, EUEI PDF

Biomass Energy Sector Planning Guide

Good governance of the biomass energy sector is essential in developing countries where traditional biomass still accounts for more than 90% of primary energy consumption. Due to population growth and urbanisation, it is unlikely that other, more expensive fuels, such as kerosene and LPG, will offset the increasing demand for biomass energy. A suitable and functioning regulatory framework can move biomass activities from the informal to the formal sector, thereby reducing negative side effects that may be connected to overuse of biomass resources and ensure availability of basic cooking energy for the poor.

With the aim to improve the governing structures in biomass energy and ensuring its sustainable use, the EU Energy Initiative  Partnership Dialogue Facility (EUEI PDF) and GIZ’s Poverty-oriented Basic Energy Services (HERA) published the Biomass Energy Sector Planning Guide, addressed to stakeholders in government institutions, NGOs and donors active in energy and natural resources. The Guide provides a step-by-step approach in developing the strategy, involving stakeholders in energy, forestry, land rights, environment, rural development and agriculture, as well as cross-sectorial themes of gender, health and education. Legislative, regulatory and fiscal measures are put into spotlight and a structured methodology is proposed to develop a coordinated and practical biomass energy strategy. Although primarily based on experiences in Africa (Rwanda, Lesotho, Malawi, Botswana, Ethiopia, Mozambique, Sierra Leone and Tanzania) the Guide’s methodology can be applied in all countries where biomass is used as a main fuel. The Guide can be downloaded at our website, in both English and French.

Technical Capacity Building for Small Hydropower in East Africa 

The East African region is endowed with a substantial small hydro potential which should have resulted in a large and rapidly growing small hydro industry (in the range of maximum 10 MW). Until recently, the small hydro industry in the region has been characterised by sporadic and isolated pilot projects that struggled to scale up, sometimes broke down and often worked below rated capacities due to lack of maintenance, repair and/or rehabilitation. Therefore, enhancing the region’s small hydro operations and maintenance (O&M) capacity is likely to be a low-cost and high-impact approach for turning around the fortunes of small hydro development in the region. 

The EUEI PDF, also in its function as Secretariat to the Africa-EU Energy Partnership (AEEP) and implementer of the Africa-EU Renewable Energy Cooperation Programme (RECP), is thus in the process of assisting the East African Community (EAC) in the area of small hydropower capacity development. The assistance is meant to trigger further support in building up a portfolio in renewable energy and energy efficiency within the region, championed by Austria and UNIDO. The project entails an advanced scoping into the area of technical training gaps in the small hydropower sector, including improved coordination of small hydro development and effective knowledge sharing in the region. The activities will also lead to a crucial strengthening of the EAC’s regional Center for Renewable Energy and Energy Efficiency (EACREEE).

 

Hydropower Plus Mini-Grid In Sierra Leone

By Marc Buiting, Finance Expert, FMO

The projects' sponsor is Smol Pawa Energy Inc. Canada, a company consisting of energy sector experts with strong ties to Sierra Leone. Smol Pawa is based in a province with well-developed clean energy systems (British Columbia, Canada) and well-positioned to utilise the North American experience in low cost and reliable power generation. Having obtained the rights from the Ministry of Energy in Sierra Leone to develop, own and operate an independent hydropower plant of 15 MW with sales to Sierra Rutile Ltd - the primary off-taker producing rutile, ilmenite and zircon from the world’s largest natural rutile deposits in Sierra Leone.

Read more

By Marc Buiting, Finance Expert, FMO

The projects' sponsor is Smol Pawa Energy Inc. Canada, a company consisting of energy sector experts with strong ties to Sierra Leone. Smol Pawa is based in a province with well-developed clean energy systems (British Columbia, Canada) and well-positioned to utilise the North American experience in low cost and reliable power generation. Having obtained the rights from the Ministry of Energy in Sierra Leone to develop, own and operate an independent hydropower plant of 15 MW with sales to Sierra Rutile Ltd - the primary off-taker producing rutile, ilmenite and zircon from the world’s largest natural rutile deposits in Sierra Leone.

A maximum of 20% of the electricity to be produced (3 MW) will be sold to the University of Njala and to the Moyamba Town, creating a mini-grid. 

An additional power line is required for the northern corridor to Moyamba Town and Njala University. This additional power line is estimated to be 73km long with an estimated investment of $3 million for the distribution system facilities in Moyamba Town. Smol Pawa is working with the Government of Sierra Leone (GoSL) to provide technical support and discuss a management contract for the transmission lines northwards to Moyamba and Njala University.

Based on the preliminary hydrology and maximum estimated power generation from the Moyamba SHPP, the estimated cumulative total CO2 emissions reduction that can be realised over the expected 25 years of Smol Pawa operations is 1,300 ktCO2.

Based on the hydrology, terrain and rated output of the Moyamba SHPP, the design will include a head pond and weir but no significant flooding or extensive dam structures are expected. The performance requirements by Smol Pawa for the turbine and generator design ensures the unhindered passage of fish and other marine traffic.

Smol Pawa understands that the electricity generation proposed is a necessary asset in the fight against poverty as defined in the United Nations Millennium Development Goals. Further, the project will:

  • increase the quality of life of over 12,000 people through access to clean, affordable, reliable electricity for local households, public service establishments, educational institutions, health facilities and water pumping systems;
  • stimulate a re-generation of economic activity in Moyamba town which used to be a vibrant business hub before the 10 year Sierra Leonean civil war of the 1990’s;
  • provide local employment with positions for over 100 skilled and unskilled workers primarily from the local communities and to engage local professionals for all suitable aspects of the planning and construction phases;
  • support women’s development as a priority – e.g. reducing the 6-8 hours spent collecting firewood, providing access to skills training, job opportunities and small business incubators;
  • increase teaching and study time at the Njala University and other education centres from 5-13 hours a day to 24 hours during peak river flows.

Smol Pawa Energy Inc. is in the process to raise the necessary development capital and is among others in talks with FMO.

 

 

Hydro Empowerment Network

By Amalia Suryani & Dipti Vaghela, Renewable Energy Advisor & Consultant, GIZ

In February 2015, a group of micro hydro power (MHP) practitioners in South and South East Asia gathered in Bandung, Indonesia, for their 2nd annual gathering under the banner Hydro Power Empowerment Network (HPNET). The lively and passionate 5-day event was held in the ASEAN Hydropower Competence Centre (HYCOM), an MHP learning centre with experts and training facilities in-house, and supported by WISIONS, Janathakshan, PT Entec, Bandung Hydro Association, and EnDev.

Read more

By Amalia Suryani & Dipti Vaghela, Renewable Energy Advisor & Consultant, GIZ

In February 2015, a group of micro hydro power (MHP) practitioners in South and South East Asia gathered in Bandung, Indonesia, for their 2nd annual gathering under the banner Hydro Power Empowerment Network (HPNET). The lively and passionate 5-day event was held in the ASEAN Hydropower Competence Centre (HYCOM), an MHP learning centre with experts and training facilities in-house, and supported by WISIONS, Janathakshan, PT Entec, Bandung Hydro Association, and EnDev.HPNET consists of practitioners with various backgrounds from public sector, private companies, and grass roots Organisation. The gathering was attended by 34 practitioners from 11 countries (Afghanistan, Bangladesh, India, Indonesia, Myanmar, Malaysia, Nepal, Pakistan, Philippines, Sri Lanka, and Thailand) making it one of the most international and diverse MHP-dedicated gatherings in Indonesia for many years. Site visits to MHP installations and turbine and MHP component manufacturer allowed participants to see closely how the industry has grown in Indonesia and to also energise the ambitions in their own countries.

As part of the agenda, intense discussion sessions were organised to refresh the network’s vision and working plan for the next year. Technology transfer, knowledge sharing and policy advice remain some of the main focus adopted within HPNET, but the importance of community involvement received special emphasis.

HPNET emphasises on overall sustainability by putting community empowerment at the core and ultimate goal. Forest and water conservation, productive use of energy, as well as technology innovation also will be strongly pursued by the Networks, which has agreed that joint collaborations on cross-border initiatives is a vital mechanism to maintain and enhance momentum of MHP development. 

This year, EnDev participated in the gathering and because it is a member of HPNET. While EnDev Indonesia brings ideas on how to pursue post-installation support, EnDev Nepal shares its experience in financing models for MHP schemes. “It gave me fresh and critical insights on renewable energy community-based development which I can use for further study and application vis-à-vis of our conditions.  It was also a great bonding event for all,” said Victoria Lopez from SIBAT, Philippines. This was echoed by Amalia Suryani, EnDev Indonesia: “This is such a dynamic group of no-nonsense experienced and enthusiastic experts where we hope we [EnDev] contributed.”

 

Electric Micro-Turbine In Marisol

By Rafael Rengifo del Castillo, Direction of Energy and Mines from the San Martin Region, Peru

Since December 2011, the Regional Directorate of Energy and Mines from the Regional Government of San Martin (DREM-SM) in Peru through a strategic alliance formed by the GIZ, throughout the Project Energising Development (EnDev) and the German company Smart Hydro Power (SHP), installed a submersible kinetic micro-turbine which is an isolated technology for energy generation in the village of Marisol, a rainforest village. 

Read more

By Rafael Rengifo del Castillo, Direction of Energy and Mines from the San Martin Region, Peru

Since December 2011, the Regional Directorate of Energy and Mines from the Regional Government of San Martin (DREM-SM) in Peru through a strategic alliance formed by the GIZ, throughout the Project Energising Development (EnDev) and the German company Smart Hydro Power (SHP), installed a submersible kinetic micro-turbine which is an isolated technology for energy generation in the village of Marisol, a rainforest village. 

Due to the kinetic energy of the Huayabamba river, the micro-turbine generates up to 5 KW that allow that 27 households access for the first time to electric energy. It does not only contribute to progress and social inclusion, but also substitutes the use of candles and wick lamps.

The current model counts on an anchor system at the shore and a manual protection system that allow moving the turbine with fenced enclosure to the shore of the river when it grows. That is why SHP has implemented an integrated system of hydro-kinetic generation: photovoltaic and diesel generator. Under this scenario, energy will be saved in battery banks, which serve as energetic supply at night. 

All the system is automates with a system of intelligent networks in order to reach the joint utilisation of hydro-kinetic and photovoltaic generation. Furthermore, since February 2015, Marisol has internet connection, which permits the monitoring of smart-grid operations from Germany and that each teacher at the school has a computer with internet. The DREM-SM will accompany the progress of the project by giving orientation for the productive use of energy and the establishment of a management model for the sustainability of the project in which the interested population must intervene.

 

  • Towards Universal Energy Access: Tanzania (Dar es Salaam, 10-11 Feb 2015)

    Read more

    More than 100 private sector, government and NGO representatives, as well as community leaders and energy innovators, concluded two days of multi-faceted and broad-based stakeholder consultations led by the United Nations Foundation's Energy Access Practitioner Network and the World Wide Fund for Nature (WWF) in support of the United Nations' Sustainable Energy For All initiative's 2030 objectives of delivering access to modern energy services for all, doubling the rate of improvement in energy efficiency and doubling the share of renewables in the global energy mix.

    Ernesto Macias, ARE President, moderated a session on Clean Energy Micro-grids, where he introduced the ElectriFI initiative and the HIO on Clean Energy Mini-grids.

  • Data Collection: Distributed Renewable Energy in Developing Countries (2 Mar 2015)

    Read more

    REN21 is looking for input on the section on Distributed Renewable Energy in Developing Countries of the Renewables 2015 Global Status Report (GSR) (QuestionnaireReferencing Guidelines). The GSR, published every year, is a reference publication on the status of renewable energy and is produced as a collaborative effort of a large community of experts.

    Please do not hesitate to contact Rana Adib or Hannah Murdock in case of additional questions.

  • Invitation: International ARE Energy Access Workshop (Madrid, 5 Mar 2015)

    Read more

    The Alliance, in cooperation with ICEX Spain Trade and Investment, has the great pleasure to invite all energy access stakeholders to attend a one-day International ARE Energy Access Workshop. To further advance cooperation between the public, private and finance sector, this workshop will provide a platform for exchange on upcoming initiatives, business opportunities and projects in the pipeline.

    Updates on the workshop programme, ARE Dinner Reception and registration form as well as details about promoting your company or organisation with a tailored sponsorship agreement can be found on the ARE website.

  • Invitation: ARE General Assembly (Madrid, 6 Mar 2015)

    Read more

    The Alliance and its board has the pleasure to invite all ARE members to attend the next ARE General Assembly, in Madrid on 6 March 2015. With the better positioning in the fields of rural development and electrification ARE members can directly contribute to the ARE strategy and activities.

    In order to create synergies, the General Assembly will be linked with an International ARE Energy Access Workshop the day before to advance cooperation between public and finance sector as well as practitioners.

  • Energy Storage Europe 2015 (Düsseldorf, 9-11 Mar 2015)

    Read more

    From 9 till 11 March, 2015 the most important energy storage events will be combined in Düsseldorf at Energy Storage Europe. Topics are technological innovation in energy storage, energy market future design, grid integration and international prospects.

    You will have the chance to meet and discuss with 100 exhibitors and over 1,500 top international decision makers and delegates to receive critical insights of market developments and technology integration.

  • Invitation: The Invest’€lec International Salon (Yaoundé, 10-13 Mar 2015)

    Read more

    he Government of Cameroon, through the Electricity Sector Regulatory Agency (ARSEL), has received from the European Union, a grant to finance the promotion of private investment initiative in the rural electrification sub sector in Cameroon, through a project dubbed Invest'€lec.

    The Invest'€lec International Salon has as a general objective, to promote private investment in rural electrification through the use of renewable energies.

    It is within the framework of promoting dialogue and Public-Private Partnerships that the Invest'€lec International Salon has been programmed. About 250 Cameroonian enterprises are expected to take part at this salon, alongside those coming from Europe and other African countries, to share their experiences and success stories.

    ARE has been selected by ARSEL as a supporting organisation. To register, kindly provide your name, organisation, position, email, telephone number and address to Ling Ng, ARE Communications and Marketing Officer, indicating what you are registering for.

  • Technical Workshop on a Quality Assurance Framework for Isolated Mini-Grids (Dar es Salaam, 11 Mar 2015)

    Read more

    The hands-on interactive half-day technical workshop on the Mini-Grids Quality Assurance (QA) Framework will be hosted by the US National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL), supported by the US Department of Energy (US DOE) and the Power Africa Initiative.

    The objective of the mini-grids QA framework project is to address key technical challenges of providing quality power to remote consumers through financially viable mini-grids. While the technology underlying mini-grid systems is relatively mature, mini-grid development is ad-hoc and fragmented, creating a major barrier to the scale-up and aggregation needed to attract private sector investments required to deploy mini-grids at the needed scale.

    Marcus Wiemann, ARE Executive Director, will contribute the private sector’s experience and perspective on key gaps and opportunities in the mini-grids field.

  • Green Mini-Grids Africa Action Learning and Exchange (ALE) program (Dar es Salaam, 12-13 Mar 2015)

    Read more

    This event is the inaugural activity of the Green Mini-Grids Africa Program (GMGs Africa), funded by the UK Department of International Development (DFID). The five year DFID program has three project components: GMGs investment program in Tanzania; GMGs investment program in Kenya; and, a Regional Facility to promote GMGs in other Sub-Saharan African countries.

    The proposed event will provide an opportunity for the three projects to come together to develop their respective work programs and learn from each other’s experiences, ensure coherence, and work on joint issues so as to maximize impact on the GMG sector as a whole.  The Action Learning and Exchange (ALE) group comprises the respective DFID leads, implementation partner leads and leading partner government counterparts who will be the primary participants of the event.

    The ALE group will also include a selected number of leading market participants and sector experts including Marcus Wiemann, ARE Executive Director, to provide feedback and challenges faced, as well as connect the GMG-Africa projects into wider efforts in the sector, including the SE4ALL Clean Energy Mini-Grids High Impact Opportunity.

  • Invitation: German-African Energy Forum (Hamburg, 4-5 May 2015)

    Read more

    ARE is a supporter of the 9th German-African Energy Forum - European Power for Africa. The Forum is the main platform of German-African energy business and regards itself as one of the most important conferences of the sector in Europe.

    The Forum will be the place to meet decision makers of the public and private sector from the African continent and Germany to inform about current issues, upcoming projects and business opportunities. This year again, there will be one session focusing only on rural electrification, moderated by Caroline Nijland, Vice-President of ARE, where the European Commission will inform about its plans and activities including its new upcoming ElectriFI initiative to strengthen the role of the private sector in this area (programme). 

    To register, please contact Lara Petersen.

  • Invitation: Off-grid Platform at Intersolar Europe 2015 (Munich, 9-12 Jun 2015)

    Read more

    Intersolar Europe, the conference organiser OTTI, the German Solar Industry Association (BSW-Solar) and the Alliance for Rural Electrification (ARE) join forces and launch the new OFF-GRID PLATFORM during Intersolar Europe 2015.

    Intersolar Europe has traditionally been the meeting place for the photovoltaic off-grid sector. In order to acknowledge this growing market, to facilitate the exchange of experience and to expand your network, Intersolar Europe, OTTI, BSW-Solar and ARE will synchronise their activities during Intersolar Europe from 2015 onwards to create a joint OFF-GRID PLATFORM and stimulate synergies.

    From 9 to 12 June 2015 you can attend the lectures and company presentations, whilst also obtaining information on the recent developments in the off -grid photovoltaic sector. The newly created OFF GRID PLATFORM will serve as the meeting point for the global off-grid sector and scientific community. We look forward to welcoming you at the Intersolar OFF-GRID PLATFORM and we would like to invite you to present your company in the spotlight as a sponsor or exhibitor.

    Feel free to make use of this unique opportunity to promote your company business by joining the Forum with a stand or slot in the programme. Kindly complete the registration form and return to Ling Ng.

  • Biomass Energy Sector Planning Guide

    Read more

    <p><em>By EUEI PDF &amp; GIZ</em></p>

    <p><a href="http://www.euei-pdf.org/thematic-studies/biomass-energy-sector-planning-... target="_blank"> <img alt="" src="http://are.afd.website/sites/default/files/pictures/images/Newsletter%20... style="margin: 1px 10px; float: left; width: 100px; height: 100px;" /></a> Worldwide, an estimated 2.6 billion people &ndash; nearly 40% of the global population &ndash; depend on traditional biomass for cooking, of which 95% live in Sub-Sahara Africa and developing Asia. In some developing countries biomass accounts for more than 90% of primary energy consumption. While this proportion may decline, it is unlikely that absolute consumption of biomass will decrease over the coming decades due to population growth and urbanisation.</p>

     

  • Renewable Energy for Inclusive and Sustainable Industrial Development: The Case of Biomass Gasification

    Read more

    By UNIDO

    There is a wide opportunity for Renewable Energy Technologies (RETs) use in industry. Companies can use RETs either as consumers, producers or both at the same time by becoming industrial prosumers of renewable energy. In particular agro-industries have a good potential to become industrial prosumers by using their own waste to generate heat and power for their own needs and to sell the excess to the neighbouring community or grid. Bioenergy and in particular biomass gasification is well suited for this purpose.

  • The Potential of Small Hydro for Rural Electrification – Focus: Latin America

    Read more

    By ARE

    This paper focuses on the innovative aspects of SHP to make it a competitive technology for rural development. It provides technical information, explains the considerable benefits of SHP as well as its role in reducing energy poverty and creating business development. It also addresses the current challenges, opportunities and public sector support for SHP in Latin America. Overall, the paper demonstrates that SHP is an appropriate and clean as well as reliable and highly efficient solution for making rural electrification and thus energy access happen.

  • World Small Hydropower Development Report 2013 - Executive Summary

    Read more

    By UNIDO & ICSHP

    As a leading UN agency in the provision of renewable energy solutions for inclusive sustainable industrial development, UNIDO collaborated with the International Center on Small Hydro Power (ICSHP), based in China, to develop a small hydropower knowledge portal and to publish the World Small Hydropower Development Report 2013 (WSHPDR 2013). This flagship assessment of UNIDO is a world-first compilation of global small hydropower data, and will be a crucial policy and investment guide for renewable energy provision through small hydropower. It aims at identifying the world’s small hydropower development status and its potential in different countries and regions by engaging with stakeholders to share information.

Please note that views expressed in the Co-Editorial, the In Focus section and the Special Feature of the newsletter, are those of the contributors and do not necessarily reflect ARE’s opinion.

Past Issues